This recording of Yaakov Rotenberg singing the song was made by Gila Flam in Israel.

Yiddish Transliteration

Nor Zorgt nisht yidn
[Amerike hot erklert]
Lyrics: Yankele Hershkowitz
 
Refrain:
Nor zorgt nisht yidn,
In zayts tsefridn,
Az indzere tsores veln nemen an ek.
Az got vet geybn,
Mir veln darleybn
Veln mir ale yidn
Kayn erets yisruel avek.
 
Verse 1:
Amerike hot erklert,
Zi makht di velt bakant
Az England miz upgeybn
Di yidn dus gantse land.
Me tantst in ale gasn,
In di shtibn iz fraylakh,
Az England shraybt shoyn inter,
Oyf deym nayem yur a meylekh.
 
Refrain: Nor zorgt nisht yidn
 
Verse 2:
Mir hobn shoyn eroplanen,
Yidish militer,
Koyln, biksn in harmatn
In mashin-gever!
 
Refrain: Nor Zorgt nisht yidn… 

English Translation

Lyrics: Yankele Hershkowitz
 
Refrain:
So don’t worry Jews,
Be happy,
For our troubles will come to an end.
With God’s help
We’ll survive,
And all of us Jews
Will leave for the Land of Israel.
 
Verse:
America has declared
And is making it known worldwide
That England must give
The Jews a country.
They’re dancing in the streets
And celebrating in the houses,
Because England is about to sign off on
A king to the new year!
 
Refrain:
So don’t worry Jews...
 

The topic of this song is the rumoured declaration of a Jewish state in British Palestine.  The song was sung in the ghetto by the street singer, troubadour Yankele Hershkovitsh, to the same melody as 'Kemfn' (Struggle).

Yaakov Rotenberg calls this song a song of prophecy.  The refrain brings comfort and hope and instructs the Jews not to be anxious since, God willing, all Jews will reach the Land of Israel, the Promised Land.

The song introduces the political idea of establishing a Jewish state, as described in the Balfour Declaration of 1917.  It claims that America is putting pressure on Britain to grant Palestine to the Jews.  As a result, the Jews who are already there are rejoicing while the agreement is signed.  This did in fact happen much later – in 1947 – with the United Nations’ Partition Resolution.

The second verse suggests with some pride the need for a Jewish army in an independent Israel, a pleasant fantasy for the ghetto inhabitants.

The melody is in a major key and features a marching rhythm.  The original melody comes from a pre-war song composed by Dovid Beyglman, 'Ganovim lid' (Thieves' song), which was probably a theatre hit that made its way to the ghetto 'cabaret'.