This a capella version is a personal recording sung by Gila Flam.

“Nit keyn rozhinkes, nit keyn mandlen" taken from the CD Ghetto Tango - Wartime Yiddish Theater, Courtesy of Traditional Crossroads (www.traditionalcrossroads.com).

Yiddish Transliteration

Nit kayn rozhinkes, nit kayn mandlen
 
Lyrics: Yeshayahu Shpigl
Melody: David Beyglman
 
Nit kayn rozhinkes in nit kayn mandlen
Der tate iz nit geforn handlen,
Lyulinke mayn zin
Lyulinke mayn zin.
 
Er hot farlozt indz in avek,
Vi di velt hot nor an ek,
Lyulinke mayn zin,
Lyulinke mayn zin.
 
S’shrayen soves, s’voyen velf,
Got derbarem zikh in helf,
Lyulinke mayn zin,
Lyulinke myn zin.
 
Ergets shtayt er in er vakht,
Mandlen, rozhinkes a sakh,
Lyulinke mayn zin,
Lyulinke man zin.
 
Kimen r’vet of zikher shoyn,
Zen dikh kind, mayn eyntsik kroyn,
Lyulinke mayn zin,
Lyulinke mayn zin.

English Translation

No More Raisins, No More Almonds
 
No raisins and no almonds,
Your father has not gone out trading,
Lu, lu, lu, my son,
Lu, lu, lu, my son.
 
He has left us, gone away,
To the end of the world,
Lu, lu, lu, my son,
Lu, lu, lu, my son.
 
Owls are screeching, wolves are howling,
God have pity on us and help us,
Lu, lu, lu, my son,
Lu, lu,lu, my son.
 
Somewhere he stands and watches,
Lots of almonds and raisins,
Lu, lu, lu, my son,
Lu, lu, lu, my son.
 
There’s no doubt that he will come,
To watch you son, my only crown,
Lu, lu, lu, my son,
Lu, lu, lu, my son.

'Nit kayn rozhinkes , nit kayn mandlen' (No more raisins, no more almonds) is a theatre lullaby composed by Dovid Beyglman, with lyrics by the poet Isaiah Shpigl. It was published by Shmerke Kaczerginski and other song collectors.

The song was written after the death of Shpigl’s daughter Eva.  It is a 'negative' version of Goldfadn’s lullaby 'Rozhinkes mit mandlen' (Raisins and almonds), perhaps the best known song of the Yiddish theatre, if not all Yiddish songs. Goldfadn’s tender lyric, itself based on a folk lullaby, asks the sweet child to sleep well; the little goat that stood under his cradle would go to market and return with raisins and almonds.  The little boy will grow up to be a scholar and a business man as well.

The ghetto version declares: No raisins, no almonds; father, who has not gone trading, will never come back home.  Where did he go?  To the world’s end.  Nature is personified; owls and wolves identify and sympathise with the man going 'who knows where'.

The song’s melody does not quote or parody Goldfadn’s original tune, or any of the folk lullabies beginning with 'Unter Yankeles/Sorele’s …vigele' (Under Yankele or Sorele’s cradle).